Innovation: Quality & Safety

Chevy Classics Profile Series: 1962 Black Corvette and 1993 Ruby Red 40th Anniversary Corvette

Mon, Mar 3 2014

During the past week-and-a-half, we shared the history behind four of the eight vehicles damaged in the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum. If you missed them, see the profiles here:

Today, we’re taking a look back on two more Corvettes that were affected. The 1993 Ruby Red 40th Anniversary Corvette, in addition to the 2009 ZR1 “Blue Devil,” will be extracted from the sinkhole today. The 1962 Black Corvette will be removed tomorrow.

1962 Black Corvette

The 1962 Black Corvette was donated to the National Corvette Museum by David Donoho of Zionsville, Ind. David saved up enough money to buy this 1962 Corvette brand-new when he was in high school. He had the nickname “The Weather Man” because his friends would tease him about how closely he would watch the weather, and quickly take his Corvette home when there was a chance of rain.

A total of 14,531 Corvettes were made in 1962 and were available in seven colors – this one being “Tuxedo Black.”

The conventional trunk design of the 1962 was the last for many years. Models to follow had no external rear storage access until 1982, but a trunk comparable to 1962’s did not reappear until 1998.

1993 Ruby Red 40th Anniversary Corvette

The 1993 40th Anniversary Corvette was donated to the National Corvette Museum by Hill and Karen Clark of Bay Village, Ohio. Hill’s love for Corvettes began when he would wash his neighbor’s brand new ’63 split window Corvette, and in exchange the neighbor allowed Hill to use the car for an hour. He used that time to take Karen cruising.

In 1970, the newlyweds purchased their own ‘Vette – a 1970 Mulsanne Blue Coupe. After their two children were born, a reluctant decision was made to sell the car. But that’s not where their Corvette ownership ended! In 1993, when their daughter entered college, Karen surprised Hill on his 50th birthday with “Ruby” – a brand-new 1993 40th Anniversary Coupe.

Stay tuned for more on the history behind the Corvettes affected by the sinkhole on FastLane.

For information on the efforts being made to restore these historic Corvettes, visit the National Corvette Museum’s website. You can also see a live stream of the Skydome restoration.

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